England Travel Tips

    


• It is customary to shake the hand of someone that you are meeting for the first time.
• When visiting friends’ homes for dinner, it is polite to bring a small gift (such as chocolates, wine or flowers, for example).
• Do not begin eating until everyone has been served.
• Casual wear is widely accepted, except in nightclubs and some restaurants.
• Topless sunbathing is allowed on specific beaches and in certain parks.
• Smoking is banned in all public places that are enclosed.
• Reserve all accommodation and dinner plans well in advance as England is very busy.
• Book your airline tickets about 3 months in advance, if possible, so that you can secure the best seats.
• Drink plenty of water while exploring the countryside as becoming dehydrated can lead to nausea and headaches.
• Opt for quality over quantity when it comes to planning your itinerary. You will avoid burning out and will also be able to remember what you have seen far better.
• Do not stay only in London, but branch out to get an authentic experience of England as a whole.
• Most rooms in Bed and Breakfasts and hotels are “double rooms” (one double bed), accommodating two people. Rates are usually per person and not per room.
• Most establishments have baths, not showers.
• Bed and Breakfasts usually require guests to share a bathroom.
• The floor on ground level is called the “ground floor” and not the “first floor”. The first floor refers to the one above the ground floor.
• To see the most of the English countryside, rent a car and drive yourself, rather than taking trains everywhere.
• Take guided tours wherever possible.
• Try not to spend your whole holiday budget on food! There are loads of special offers in stores like Tesco that allow you to eat on a shoestring (although you are likely to come back a little heftier than when you left).
• When ordering sandwiches, expect them to be made with butter (not mayonnaise or margarine).
• The weather conditions are fairly unpredictable – bring clothes for all possibilities.
• Some small shops do not accept debit or credit cards. It is wise to get travellers’ checks in Pound Sterling.
• Conversion fees for currencies are high, so try not to convert your money in England.
• In an emergency, call 999 or 112 and ask for Ambulance, Fire, Police or Coast Guard when connected.
• When referring to 10h30 (for example), an English person will say “half ten”.


• It is a term of endearment for locals to call you “love”, “hun”, “darling”, “sweetheart”, “mate”, etc... However, women being called “darling” by men may be on the receiving end of an unwelcome compliment (or catcall).
• England is best between April and September in terms of weather conditions and the availability of various attractions and activities.
• In England, cars drive on the left-hand side of the road, and drivers sit on the right-hand side of the vehicle.
• Avoid waiting alone at bus stops and on train platforms.
• Always use a licensed taxi.
• Keep your cash or expensive items concealed, especially on public transport.
• Electricity: 240V 50HzHz (you will need a converter and adapter for plug-in electronics)
• Telephone country code: 44