England - Coastal Attractions

    

England has a vast and varied coastline. Dotted along it is a plethora of unique attractions, villages, towns and natural wonders. Although England may not have a global reputation as a beach-goers’ paradise, there are a variety of things to do and see along its ample shores.

Cornwall
Cornwall is a favourite amongst surfers and swimmers and has over 720 kilometres (or 450 miles) of pristine coastline, with 300 different beaches. However, it is not only a desirable destination for water sports enthusiasts, but also for those interested in the history and heritage of South West England. There are ancient structures, dating back to the Iron Age, along the Cornish coast, as well as quaint fishing villages and coves that have been carved out of the rock by millennia of water erosion. Several locations along Cornwall’s coast have been deemed UNESCO World Heritage Sites, many of which represent the mining community. These include Geevor Tin Mine and Poldark Mine.

In addition to walking and hiking paths, visitors of Cornwall are invited to experience the vibrant nightlife or indulge in some adrenalin-pumping water sports.

Image of the lighthouse at Beachy Head, East Sussex, England
The lighthouse at Beachy Head, East Sussex,
England

Northumberland
The coast in Northumberland has earned the title of being an official Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty (AONB) for its combination of ancient castles, rolling dunes, quaint villages and imposing mountains. Covering about 96.5 kilometres (60 miles), the Northumberland Coast is also part of the International North Sea Trail. Just off the coast is Coquet Island, which is home to the country’s rarest seabird, the Roseate Tern.

Tyne and Wear
The coastline of Tyne and Wear includes the city of Sunderland, which boasts several beaches that have won awards, as well as gorgeous pathways along which to amble in appreciation of the natural beauty. The Tyne area is split into the North Tyne and the South Tyne. The North Tyne includes three Blue Flag beaches (awarded as such for their safety, efficient management and environmental responsibility) as well as numerous resorts, while the South Tyne is home to an array of wildlife species and stretches of sandy beach. Longsands, situated in Tynemouth, is a fabulous favourite for surfers.

North Yorkshire
The coastline of North Yorkshire is home to a number of stunning resorts and charming fishing villages. It is characterised by jagged cliff faces as well as a variety of exquisite plant- and animal species. The North Yorkshire Heritage Coast offers visitors the opportunity to walk along a path that has been etched right at the top of the cliff. This path is just less than 50 kilometres long and is great for cycling too.


Some of the locally acclaimed destinations along this coast include:

• Scarborough
• Whitby
• Staithes
• Filey

Somerset
Somerset offers the entire spectrum of coastal attractions – from gorgeous harbours and picturesque beaches and coves to fishing villages, resorts and marinas. There are two nature reserves; namely Bridgwater Bay and Uphill, as well as different Areas of Outstanding Natural Beauty and Special Scientific Interest. This testifies to the diversity that Somerset presents and the unique experience it offers.

For more information, please view: http://uk-shore.com/